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Student Number 982202027
Author Jing-shian Wang(t)
Author's Email Address No Public.
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Department Physics
Year 2010
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document Master's Thesis
Language English
Title The physical properties of phytosterol-containing lipid bilayers
Date of Defense 2011-07-11
Page Count 56
Keyword
  • DPPC
  • ld
  • lipid raft
  • lo
  • NMR
  • phase transition
  • so
  • ]-sitosterol
  • Abstract Lateral heterogeneities exist in biological membranes of living cell. The heterogeneity is proposed to be a coexistence of lipid domains with differing degrees of order, lipid/protein compositions, and physical properties in the membrane. Recent evidence suggests that not only cholesterol, the major sterol found in mammals, but other sterols such as ]-sitosterol are important for the formation of a specific domain called lipid raft. ]-sitosterol is one of plant sterols and its chemical structure is similar to that of cholesterol. While most study of lipid-sterol interaction focuses on cholesterol, little is known about plane sterols. In addition, it is pointed out that ]-sitosterol decreases serum of cholesterol and reduced cardiovascular disease. We investigate the phase behavior of model membranes composed of 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and ]-sitosterol using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H NMR). The sn-1 chain of DPPC is deuterium labeled. The 2H NMR spectra were taken as a function of temperature and ]-sitosterol concentration. Our data shows that addition of ]-sitosterol promotes the formation of the lo phase. Moreover, ]-sitosterol has opposite ordering effect on the DPPC membranes below and above Tm: It decreases the order of DPPC membranes below Tm, whereas increases the chain orders of DPPC above Tm. Finally, the partial phase diagram is determined from 2H NMR spectra. Coexistence of so+ld phase is observed at low ]-sitosterol concentration. On the other hand, there are two two-phase coexistence regions, so+lo and lo+ld, found below and above Tm, respectively, at intermediated ]-sitosterol concentration. A three-phase line separates these two regions is observed at 37XC.
    Table of Content Table of Contents
    Abstract I
    Abstract in Chinese III
    Acknowledgements IV
    Table of Contents V
    List of Figures VII
    Chapter1 1
    Introduction 1
    1.1 Biological membrane 1
    1.2 ]-sitosterol 2
    1.3 Fluid mosaic model 3
    1.4 Lipid 4
    1.5 Lipid raft 5
    1.6 Phase behavior 6
    1.7 DPPC membrane 8
    Chapter 2 10
    2.1 Sample preparation 10
    2.2 NMR principle 10
    2.2.1 Quadrupole interaction 12
    2.2.2 Powder Spectrum 13
    2.2.3 Quadrupolar Splitting and SCD 15
    2.2.4 Average chain order parameter (first moment) 16
    2.3 Hardware 18
    Chapter 3 21
    Results and discussion 21
    Chapter 4 37
    Conclusions 37
    References 39
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    Advisor
  • Ya-Wei Hsueh()
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    Date of Submission 2011-08-15

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