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Student Number 954203026
Author Shih-Chiang Wu(§d¸Ö±j)
Author's Email Address 954203026@cc.ncu.edu.tw
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 2496 times. Download 11 times.
Department Information Management
Year 2007
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document Master's Thesis
Language English
Title How the Advertising Form Effectiveness Varies by Consumer Gender and Endorser Type in Service Ads
Date of Defense 2008-06-05
Page Count 46
Keyword
  • Ad form
  • endorser
  • gender
  • narrative
  • story-form ad
  • Abstract In marketing, advertising always plays a very important role. How to effectively convey the product¡¦s or service¡¦s message in the ad to the consumers is really a challenge. Recently, more and more service ads use the narrative, that is, to convey the service¡¦s message to consumers in a story-based form. This represents that story-based form advertisements are more and more popular and being capable to communicate effectively with consumers. However, we can not judge that an attribute-based form advertisement is less effective than a story-based form advertisement, because there are still many successful service advertisements conveying the product¡¦s message to consumers in an attribute-based form nowadays. Hence, this study uses endorser type and consumer gender as the moderating variables. We try to find out if there are interactions between the two moderating variables and advertisement form, and how it affects the consumers¡¦ attitude toward ad and purchase intention in service ads.
      This study uses a quasi-experiment employing a between-subjects design with two levels of gender (female versus male). The other two experimental treatments include advertisement form (attribute-based versus story-based), and endorser type (celebrity versus expert). A French restaurant is recommended in the experimental ads. MANOVA and univariate ANOVA are used to test our hypotheses.
      The results show that when the consumer are females, the story-based form ad is more effective than the attribute-based ad; when the consumer are males, the attribute-based ad is significant more effective than the story-based ad. In addition, endorser type also affects purchase intention.
    Table of Content Contentsi
    List of Tablesii
    List of Figuresiii
    1. Introduction1
    2. Literature Review4
    2.2 Story-Based Process5
    2.3 Gender7
    2.4 Endorsers9
    2.4.1 The Source Credibility Model10
    2.4.2 The Source Attractiveness Model11
    3. Method13
    3.1 Theoretical Framework13
    3.2 Stimulus Materials and Dependent Measures13
    3.3 Experiment Design17
    3.4 Sample and Data Collection17
    4. Analysis and Result19
    4.1 Reliability19
    4.2 Hypotheses Test20
    4.2.1 MANOVA Test and Univariate ANOVA Test20
    4.2.2 Simple Main Effect Test of Advertisement Form by Gender22
    4.2.3 Simple Main Effect Test of Advertisement Form by Endorser Type25
    4.3 Summary of Hypothesis28
    5. Discussion and Managerial Implication29
    5.1 Discussion29
    5.2 Managerial implications30
    5.3 Limitation and Future Research31
    ¤¤¤å¤åÄm33
    References34
    Appendix42
    I. Questionnaire42
    II. Experimental Advertising 1: Attribute-based Form with a Celebrity Endorser43
    III. Experimental Advertising 2: Story-based Form with a Celebrity Endorser44
    IV. Experimental Advertising 3: Attribute-based Form with an Expert Endorser45
    V. Experimental Advertising 4: Story-based Form with an Expert Endorser46
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    Advisor
  • Yi-Ching Hsieh(Á¨ÌÀR)
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    Date of Submission 2008-06-13

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