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Student Number 84122009
Author Ping-Chieh Ma(馬丙杰)
Author's Email Address No Public.
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 420 times. Download 10 times.
Department English
Year 1997
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document Master's Thesis
Language zh-TW.Big5 Chinese
Title The "Reel" Self and Performative Reality in Woody Allen's Zelig and The Purple Rose of Cairo
Date of Defense 0000-00-00
Page Count 95
Keyword
  • 1920
  • 30 periods
  • capitalism
  • film industry
  • gender performance
  • individualism
  • racial identity
  • Abstract My thesis mainly deals with Woody Allen's two films: "Zelig" and "ThePurple Rose of Cairo." I focus on the relation
    between the formation of identity and the role of mass media,
    especially American film industry from its burgeoning in the
    1920s to maturation in the 1930s. Both films make use of the
    fictional quality of film product and the culture phenomenonof
    star to disorder the hierarchy of reality and fiction, and to
    parody the sense of self-consciousness. We may view these two
    films as an allegory for the formation process in which "reel"
    human identities are shaped up with theestablishment of American
    film industry. The image of real man with legitimated
    identities finds references in the ideologically designed stars
    in the reelworld. Zelig is recognized as a true American after
    his chameleon performancequalifies social demand. "The Purple
    Rose of Cairo" represents a miserable world where the cinema is
    the public's last hope to hang on to. What is marked in the
    films is the prevailing anxiety of Americans, especially males,
    caused by the ideally scripted models and an emasculinizing
    social condition.The self that is promised to be fulfilled in
    American dream is founded only in stylized new selves,
    symbolized in imagined film products.   However, the ideal
    images are products in a society where the individualis under
    the demand of the collective. This individual dream in teh
    images isrevealed as illusory and an impossible imagiantion
    promoted by Hollywood andAmerican government in different
    periods. In the conflic between the dream and social demands,
    the American self is realized in a condition of alwayschanging
    and being alienated. The self has to conform to the artificial
    imagesto satisfy its insatiable dream of being independent and
    ideal. As the twofilms show, the imaginary identity provided by
    the dream may cause the spectator's exploitation by Hollywood
    and can even be held responsible for the misery in life.
    Table of Content Introduction.........................................................................................................1
    Chapter One Zelig: A Mocumentary on the Performative American self..............11
    Chapter Two The Purple Rose of Cairo: A Metafilm on Hollywood Re(a/e)lity......51
    Conclusion........................................................................................................84
    Works Cited..........................................................................................................93
    Reference Allen, Woody. Zelig. Warner Bros. 1983.
    ---. The Purple Rose o/Cairo. Orion. 1985.
    Balio, Tino. Grand Design. Berkeley: California Press, 1993.
    Benjamin, Walter. "The Work of Art in the Age ofMechanical Reproduction." Illumination. Ed. Hannah Arendt. Trans. Harry Zohn. New York: Schocken, 1968.
    Doane, Mary Ann. "The Economy ofDesire: The Commodity Form inlofthe Cinema." Movies andMass Culture. Ed. John Belton. New Jersey: Rutgers, 1996.
    Downing, Crystal. "Broadway Roses: Woody Allen's Romantic Inheritance." Literaturelfllm Quarterly 17: 1 (1989): 13-17.
    Dunne, Michael. "Stardust Memories, The Purple Rose of Cairo, and the Tradition of Metafiction." Film Criticism Fall, 1987: 19-27. Dyer, Richard. "Entertainment and Utopia." Movies and Methods. Ed. Bill Nichols. London: University of Carlifornia Press, 1985.
    ---. "Charisma." Stardom. Ed. Christine Gledhill. New York: Routledge, 1991.
    ---. "A Star Is Born and the Construction of Authenticity." Stardom. Ed. Christine Gledhill. New York: Routledge, 1991.
    Eckert, Charles. "The Carole Lombard in Macy's Window." Movies and Mass Culture. Ed. John Belton. New Jersey: Rutgers, 1996.
    Featherston, Mike. Consumer Culture and Postmodernism. London: Sage, 1991.
    Feldstein, Richard. "The Dissolution ofthe Self in Zelig." Literalurer/Film Quarterrly. vl3. n3. (1985): 155-160.
    Girgus, Sam B. The Films ofWoody Allen. New York: Cambridge, 1993.
    Green, Daniel "The Comedian's Dilemma: Woody Allen's 'Serious' Comedy." Literature/Film Quarterly. 19:2 (1991): 70-76.
    Grimsted, David. "The Purple Rose of Popular Culture Theory: An Exploration of Intellecyual Kitsch." American Quarterly 43(1991):541-578.
    Kaplan, E. Ann. Looking for the Other. New York: Routledge, 1996.
    Maltby, Richard, and Ian Craven. Hollywood Cinema. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1995.
    Morris, C. "Woody Allen's Comic Irony." Literature/Film Quarterly. 15:3 (1987): 175-180.
    Munoz, Willy O. "Beyond the Copacabana: The Pmple Rose of Cairo as Metafilm." Varieties of Film Expressiol1 iv (1989): 99-104.
    Neustadt, Richard. Presidential Power andModern Presidents. New York: The Free Press, 1990.
    Perlmutter, Ruth. "Woody Allen's Zelig An American Jewish Parody." 206-221.
    Pogel, Nancy. "The Little Man Becomes a Legend." Woody Allen. Boston: Twayne,
    1987.
    ---. Woody Allen. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1987.
    Preussner, Arnold W. "Woody Allen's The Purple Rose of Cairo and the Genres of Comedy." Vlerature Film Quarterly (1988): 39-43.
    Rathgeb, Douglas L. "Faces in the Newsreel." Post Script. 6:3 (1987):31-44.
    Rojek, Chris. Decentring Leisure. London: Sage, 1995.
    Rubin, Martin. "The Crowd, the Collective, and the Chorus: Busby Berkeley and the
    New Deal." Movies andMass Culture. Ed. John Belton. New Jersey: Rutgers, 1996.
    Stacey, Jackie. "Hoolywood Cinema -The Great Escape." Star Gazing. New York: Routledge, 1994.
    Starn, Robert. "From Dialogism to Zelig." Subversive Pleasure. 187-218.
    Stenberg, Douglas G. "Common Themes in Gogol's 'Nos' and Woody Allen's The Purple Rose of Cairo" Literature Film Quarterly (1991): 109-13.
    Studlar, Gaylyn. This Mad Masquerade. New York: Columbia, 1996.
    Traube, Elizabeth. Dreaming Identities. Oxford: Westview Press, 1992.
    Tutt, Ralph. "Truth, Beauty, and Travesty: Woody Allen's Well Wrought Urn." Literaturelfilm Quarterly 19:2 (1991): 109-113.
    Wood, Robin. "Papering the Cracks: Fantacy and Ideology in the Reagan Era." Movies and Mass Culture. Ed. John Belton. New Jersey: Rutgers, 1996.
    Advisor
  • Lin Wenchi., Li Jerome., Shen Shiao-in.(林文淇, 李振亞, 沈曉茵)
  • Files No Any Full Text File.
    Date of Submission

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